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Description

Authors:

  • Audrey Aday, Univ. of British Columbia
  • Simon Lolliot, Univ. of British Columbia
  • Toni Schmader, Univ. of British Columbia
In two studies, after learning about implicit gender bias in STEM, women reported significantly higher levels of social identity threat, which predicted greater intergroup anxiety (S1) and avoidance of cross-sex collaboration on a STEM task (S1 & S2). Together, these results suggest that learning about implicit gender bias could lead women to avoid collaboration with men in STEM settings.
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